The Future of Professional Psychology

As a followup to last year's controversial session, Dr. David W. Ballard invited me to serve on a panel discussing the future of professional psychology at this year's APA State Leadership Conference.

A word cloud created by Dr. Ballard based upon discussion by the panelists. Image Credit: tagxedo.com / CC BY-NC-SA 3.0

A word cloud created by Dr. Ballard based upon discussion by the panelists. Image Credit: tagxedo.com / CC BY-NC-SA 3.0

Highlights from the session included the need for psychologists to adopt new technologies, become involved in legislative and regulatory developments, and understand marketplace trends. 

Here's an excerpt:

[Dr. Jo Linder-Crow] says psychologists need to learn the language of persuasion to talk to other provider communities. Be able to say “this is what psychologists do” to demonstrate the value of the profession and differentiate psychology from other health care professions. Psychologists always need to be learning – whether it’s business skills or technology, or just knowing what you don’t know, according to Linder-Crow.

[Dr. Jennifer Kelly] emphasizes that psychologists must be both health care professionals and business people, and that they may need to change in order to meet emerging needs. Training to work with changing demographics and an aging population can help psychologists begin meeting some of the new demands of the marketplace.

For more from this session, read a full summary by clicking here.